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Thread: TPI: why do their players have bad backs?

  1. #1
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    TPI: why do their players have bad backs?

    As I understand it from Facebook discussions, Ben Crane has been working with TPI for years. His swing is a "poster child" for the pared back, limited movement pattern they claim to be "more efficient over time", which I interpret to mean less prone to wear and tear. Their philosophy is derived from Dr. Stuart McGill, who preaches avoidance of spinal flexion in all activities. He believes the spine has a finite number of flexes before it will inevitably become damaged. So don't flex it!









    Today, Crane was forced to withdraw from the Bridgestone because of his back.

    http://www.golfchannel.com/news/golf...e-back-injury/


    Could it be McGill and TPI have it backwards? That appropriate spinal flexion should be incorporated in all activities, or stresses will occur that can create injuries over time? That is Dr. Serge Gracovetsky's belief.







    Jeff

  2. #2
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    Crane's 2013 season ended abruptly due to his back:

    http://espn.go.com/golf/story/_/id/9...on-back-injury




    Jeff

  3. #3
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    Looks like visits to Dr. Rose of TPI come with a 60-day "sell by" date:


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    Jeff

  4. #4
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    A quick Google search shows Crane has been working with Dr. Rose of TPI since at least 2006, and missed much of 2007 due to back injuries...



    Jeff

  5. #5
    Jeff, what do you think is causing his successive back injuries?

  6. #6
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    Luis, I'm in no position to know. What I do know is TPI preaches avoiding lateral bend, which makes rotating more difficult, not easier, and would subject the back to more stress. I have a theory that injuries attributed to the X-factor occur because the player isn't using the spine properly, i.e., combining lumbar lordosis with right side lateral bend, which naturally creates X-factor. Instead, they use muscles to "force" the separation of the shoulders and hips, something TPI teaches. I don't think that is healthy.




    Jeff

  7. #7
    Well if you just try to pull the grip off the shaft you should be fine! No need to shallow out the AoA with your body. Remember all you have is your hands and hand path and the force along that path.

  8. #8
    Lloyd Higley Guest
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    Recipe for back issues.....

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