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Thread: Video Shooting Tips

  1. #1
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    Video Shooting Tips

    There are some very important camera positions and zooms needed in order to get the least amount of distortion, highest level of detail visible and therefore most accuracy when viewing.

    Widest angle needed



    From front view, this is about as wide a shot youíll need. You can barely see the club at the top of the backswing. While I like looking at trees and the sky, they arenít as interesting as the golf swing so please do not fill the screen with background material.




    From target line, this is wide enough for most swings.





    If you have a shorter backswing, you may need to get a wider shot so you can see the clubhead and face angle at the top.





    If too wide, it is difficult to see anything.



    Zooms




    This would be a good full body zoom for looking at body/arm movements. For this shot, we do not need to see the ball.





    To see hands moving through impact clearly, this is a great zoom.





    Shooting down at the ball, one can see the movements of the clubface. Also, have alignment rods on the ground or align with the range mat to provide reference angle.





    This shot is good to see how your hands are affecting the clubface at impact.


    Target line shooting hints





    Put a club between your feet and ball to align the camera correctly. The feet should look parallel to the camera. The camera should be about hip height.




    This angle is not correct since feet are not parallel to the camera.





    Here Iím shooting with the camera too high for seeing plane without distortion. For viewing plane the camera should be closer to hip high.


    Shutter Speed




    Shutter speed of 1/4000th of a second or faster will allow the club and moving body to be viewed with no blurring.





    Great target line position to see path but ruined by slow shutter speed.


    Other hints


    ∑ Obviously the sun should be on the subject or part of the body of interest. Should try to avoid having shadows or backlighting (sun behind you) if possible.

    ∑ Wearing stripes can be very helpful. Dark solid colors makes seeing detail difficult.

  2. #2
    Also try and be consistent each time you film, wont help much doing a comparison photo if you have it higher/lower or further away from week to week or whatever.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Martin View Post


    If too wide, it is difficult to see anything.
    Hey! Since when did I become left handed? =)

    Good article though. I'll definitely mess around with some of these less often used angles.

    One question though:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Martin View Post


    This angle is not correct since feet are not parallel to the camera.
    Shouldn't the filming angle be parallel with the target-line? If the feet are closed (or open) to the target-line, shooting down the target-line won't have the feet parallel to the filming angle.

  4. #4
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    Jeff, do you have any scientific evidence that backs up you claims. If so, I would love to read a paper or two.

  5. #5
    Hey Steve, do you have any scientific evidence that backs up your reason for asking that question? just kidding!

    Hey Jeff, good review. What I am not clear about is how far the shooter should stand from the golfer. A fixed distance and then adjust the zoom for proper size?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveT View Post
    Jeff, do you have any scientific evidence that backs up you claims. If so, I would love to read a paper or two.
    What claims are that, Steve?

    Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by golfdad View Post
    Hey Steve, do you have any scientific evidence that backs up your reason for asking that question? just kidding!

    Hey Jeff, good review. What I am not clear about is how far the shooter should stand from the golfer. A fixed distance and then adjust the zoom for proper size?
    Actually, Kelvin put this together, not me. I just posted it for him, which I guess I should have acknowledged. Anyway, it seems that Kelvin has gotten VERY busy lately, so he is delegating the mundane stuff to me.

    Jeff

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Martin View Post
    What claims are that, Steve?

    Jeff
    That certain camera distances and zooms are "needed in order to get the least amount of distortion, highest level of detail visible and therefore most accuracy when viewing." Was there a study conducted which lead to this conclusion?

  9. #9
    TeeAce Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveT View Post
    That certain camera distances and zooms are "needed in order to get the least amount of distortion, highest level of detail visible and therefore most accuracy when viewing." Was there a study conducted which lead to this conclusion?
    I'm able to keep one or two hours demonstration about those, or four hours if you want include the lighting there also. 2D-distortions, camera angle distortions, barrel effect, distance distortion, shutter problems...

  10. #10
    not sure if this info is helpful:

    http://www.basic-photography-tips.co...aphy-tips.html

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveT View Post
    That certain camera distances and zooms are "needed in order to get the least amount of distortion, highest level of detail visible and therefore most accuracy when viewing." Was there a study conducted which lead to this conclusion?
    Yeah, Kelvin and Rick Malm did a study: shot 300fps video of hundreds of tour pros from all sorts of distances and angles. This reflects their conclusions from that study.

    I have a few questions for you in another thread:

    http://jeffygolf.com/showthread.php?106-Really

    Awaiting your response.

    Jeff

  12. #12
    Thinking I should get serious about working on my swing. I seemed to have lost 10 MPH across the board after a two week golf trip. Maybe it's the swing speed radar, since I was hitting the ball pretty well.

    Anyway, I am looking for suggestions for vid cameras. I have a small cam corder but it's a pain in the neck to use. I seem to recall Kelvin recommending a Casio unit that is fairly cheap on ebay but I don't recall specifics. Probably somethng better or cheaper is available now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by AAA View Post
    Thinking I should get serious about working on my swing. I seemed to have lost 10 MPH across the board after a two week golf trip. Maybe it's the swing speed radar, since I was hitting the ball pretty well.

    Anyway, I am looking for suggestions for vid cameras. I have a small cam corder but it's a pain in the neck to use. I seem to recall Kelvin recommending a Casio unit that is fairly cheap on ebay but I don't recall specifics. Probably somethng better or cheaper is available now.

    The big problem is that Casio has discontinued offering video recording with manually set shutter speed (usually called "shutter priority"), so you can wind up with 240fps videos that are still blurry at impact. I believe the cheapest Casio alternative with shutter priority is the discontinued FH-100, which you can still find new from some dealers for around $600.

    FWIW, the first generation Casio with high-speed video, the EX-F1 that Kelvin and I have, cost around $1,000 when we bought them, now they are much more than that (a new one is currently listed on Amazon at $3,349!). The next generation FH-20, which was not as fully-featured as the EX-F1, can be had new for around $1,000, again multiples of its retail price when being produced by Casio.

    I could be out-of-date, but, amazingly, I don't think there is a consumer-level video recorder available that offers shutter speed priority. I believe the current Casios have shutter priority for still pictures but not videos, so don't be fooled.


    Jeff

  14. #14
    Thanks Jeff. I guess this is a lot more complicated than I realized. I'm not a camera guy at all, but I do know the difference in shutter priority and aperture priority. Something like the Nikon D3000 claims to have both modes, but they don't specify if it is for video.

    Ebay has new casio FH-20's for sale for around $400, but the sellers are in japan, so that raises some obvious issues.

    Am I correct in assuming that camcorders are no good for this type of work?

    Anyway, thanks for the assistance.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AAA View Post
    Thanks Jeff. I guess this is a lot more complicated than I realized. I'm not a camera guy at all, but I do know the difference in shutter priority and aperture priority. Something like the Nikon D3000 claims to have both modes, but they don't specify if it is for video.

    Ebay has new casio FH-20's for sale for around $400, but the sellers are in japan, so that raises some obvious issues.

    Am I correct in assuming that camcorders are no good for this type of work?

    Anyway, thanks for the assistance.

    I'm not familiar with the Nikon.

    A far as buying an FH-20 from Japan, I believe Bob Becker, a fellow member at Black Oak who attended the West Point seminar, bought an FH-100 from overseas and when it arrived it didn't work. However, as I recall, he sent it to a regional Casio service center and it was repaired free of charge. I would go for it.


    Jeff

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